Non-Fiction Books:

The Irish Art of Controversy

Format

Hardback

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The Irish Art of Controversy by Lucy McDiarmid
$117.99
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Description

Controversies are high drama: in them people speak lines as colorful and passionate as any recited on stage. In the years before the 1916 Rising, public battles were fought in Ireland over French paintings, a maverick priest, Dublin slum children, and theatrical censorship. Controversy was "popular," wrote George Moore, especially "when accompanied with the breaking of chairs."In her new book, Lucy McDiarmid offers a witty and illuminating account of these and other controversies, antagonistic exchanges with no single or no obvious high ground. They merit attention, in her view, not because the Irish are more combative than other peoples, but because controversies functioned centrally in the debate over Irish national identity. They offered to everyone direct or vicarious involvement in public life: the question they articulated was not "Irish Ireland or English Ireland" but "whose Irish Ireland" would dominate when independence was finally achieved.The Irish Art of Controversy recovers the histories of "the man who died for the language," Father O'Hickey, who defied the bishops in his fight for Irish Gaelic; Lady Gregory and Bernard Shaw's defense of the Abbey Theatre against Dublin Castle; and the 1913 "Save the Dublin Kiddies" campaign, in which priests attacked socialists over custody of Catholic children. The notorious Roger Casement-British consul, Irish rebel, humanitarian, poet-forms the subject of the last chapter, which offers the definitive commentary on the long-lasting controversy over his diaries.McDiarmid's use of archival sources, especially little-known private letters, indicates the way intimate exchanges, as well as cartoons, ballads, and editorials, may exist within a public narrative. In its original treatment of the rich material Yeats called "intemperate speech," The Irish Art of Controversy suggests new ways of thinking about modern Ireland and about controversy's bluff, bravado, and improvisational flair.

Author Biography

Lucy McDiarmid is Professor of English at Villanova University. She has been the Carole and Gordon Segal Visiting Professor of Irish Literature at Northwestern University and Visiting Professor of English at Princeton. A former president of the American Conference for Irish Studies, McDiarmid is also author of Saving Civilization: Yeats, Eliot, and Auden between the Wars and Auden's Apologies for Poetry, and coeditor of High and Low Moderns: Literature and Culture 1889-1939 and Lady Gregory: Selected Writings. She is a fellow of the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library for 2005-2006.
Release date NZ
May 17th, 2005
Country of Publication
United States
Illustrations
31 halftones
Imprint
Cornell University Press
Pages
304
Dimensions
152x229x27
ISBN-13
9780801443534
Product ID
1825836

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