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Death of Numbers

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Death of Numbers

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Paperback

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The Death of Numbers by John Henry Morel
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"The Death of Numbers" is more about where numbers came from rather than where they are going.This book should have been nominated for a Nobel Prize in mathematics or at least a nomination for literature or poetry.If math was ever poetic, it was poetry in "The Death of Numbers" by John Henry Morel. It seems that the author has a penchant for the absolute nature of language in addition to his penchant for the absolute nature of math and physics. It could have very well been titled, "The Death of Language" or "The Downfall of Literature." He could have dispensed with the math altogether and completely rewritten the science of language. He plays with language like a preschooler plays with crayons: Easily and with great dexterity. The beauty of the result is a fixed notion of where we are going in scientific endeavor! Where we are going is, for the most part, the highest level of development ever to be achieved by a developed civilization. In addition to discussing the current state of mathematics and the use of numbers in commerce today, he ramifies the equation by including detailed analysis of what happened along the way from the earliest civilizations onward. He doesn't skip a beat between the first and greatest cultures to walk this planet and neither does he tell all in the face of his task and numbered suites of poetic endeavor in this book. Chapter by chapter he more finely essays the strengths and weaknesses of a society built upon a systematic and symbolic regimen of alphabetaic symbols and numeric junk, while simultaneously discovering for us the essence of the problem underneath all the layers of heightened release and sophomoric tendencies in modern society. He doesn't beat around the bush any more than a page or two and then begins to define for us exactly what is missing and what "should" be missing from the equation.The science of numbers is this, according to the author: That math can once again be what it was in the beginning; a whole and completely integrous system of symbolic language without flaws and crippling devices put there by prior inhabitants to disrupt and completely interfere with social and moral and economic success on the level of sublime unity and conscious discovery and invention. The acceleration of civilization and the eventual arrival at its zenith or zennit of of excellence can only be achieved by removing what was basically placed as a hurdle by those that came before us. Adapting older systems of representation and communication through language does not mean stepping back or faltering for a moment. It means accelerating to the point at which one may discover what was already there and no longer giving allegiance to a language that was altered in the process of its development to "interfere" with success and social development in order to control those that used that language. References to the Fall of Babylon ring true here, but the history of such impedances goes much further back, before the early Macedonians and certainly before the Egyptians starting using ropes to measure and build the pyramids. Like it or not, "The Death of Numbers" accounts for a great number of influences over the ages, but in no way does it solve the problem that man has yet to surmount: "The Death of Numbers" is chiefly an interim solution to assist us in understanding what the real problem is, not what the real solution is. It is left to the reader to deduce what the possible solutions are in the wake of the discovery that the mathematics we were given was given to us to prevent us from becoming the best that we could be, in order to halt us in any semblance of progress as a civilization.Rodaian PressPaperback, 9.61" x 6.69," 136 pages. First Edition.RodaianPress.com
Release date NZ
April 21st, 2009
Country of Publication
United States
Imprint
Rodaian Press
Pages
136
Dimensions
244x170x7
ISBN-13
9781935436782
Product ID
2954301

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