Fiction Books:

Courtesy Orchis

The Collection



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Courtesy Orchis: The Collection by Courtesy Orchis
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3.5 out of 5 stars Based on 2 Customer Ratings

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"Deviating From the Path"
4 stars"

It’s about deviating from the path that’s expected of you to one of your own choosing, a path free from the influence of government and society. On this second path, your responsibilities are governed only by a code of honor between you and the person next to you.

The story is also a profoundly personal tale of caution. There are consequences to living your life by your own rules (even in the early 1990s). There were highs; the colorful characters, the music, the nature… But there were lows; the authoritarian corruption, the institutional prejudice…

The Collection comes from a time that doesn’t exist any longer. We couldn’t drop off the radar any more than we could learn to fly on our own. The book isn’t a road map to our own freedom, but it’s an interesting rumination on our own personal obligations to what is expected of us, our responsibilities to our fellows and our role in the grander order. Read this book.

"Collection of the Past"
3 stars"

Courtesy Orchis published a handful of chapbooks during the 90's, which her friends would occasionally receive through the snail mail. She reissued these in this singular volume. As with the chapbooks, there are a couple of interesting, well written verses, the remainder are lyrics. There are unusual pieces of art throughout, which contribute to the narrative well.


Courtesy Orchis explores the hidden recesses of the mind in provocative and sometimes disturbing poetry. She inspires and intrigues with her innovative style, and seems to have the confidence to confront painful issues in an aesthetic form which portrays depths of feeling. Orchis' acute introspection and linguistic versatility give an interpretive freedom to the reader, and so from the intimate and personal is created a work of universal appeal: Minerva Press She is a genius. The Poverty Poet is the top 'babe' in 'British' poetry at the moment. Courtesy breaks taboos and dangerously identifies herself with nature as it is raped and enslaved. The honesty in these poems in direct: Andrew Jordan (Editor/Poet) Something very personal is going on here. Slowly it dawns on me, guarded at first, I am allowed to peer in, as if wiping a steamed up mirror. Part of Courtesy's life has been carefully placed in this book and sealed. Not for complete abandonment, just for a rest. Control is the key here. A cross examination of life. What makes it so private is the passing mention of everyday names, written with someone in mind.The poems aren't necessarily linked in an obvious theme, except for maybe an intolerance of 'outside opinion' against our own. She expresses what her surrounders might think she thinks, a remembrance of how she was and will be now. Is this true for everybody or just the chosen few? And then the tide turns. Instead of being drawn in, I feel the urge to back away. I want to take a distant critical approach. Perhaps I'm scared. Courtesy doesn't hint at her beliefs but smacks you right in the face with them. However a softer side is bred, our cynical Poet has been in love. (I breathed a sigh of relief): Mary Hooton (Editor/Poet)
Release date NZ
August 5th, 2007
Country of Publication
United Kingdom
black & white illustrations
The London Press
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